Will

Will Name Change Affect Direct Deposit?

calendar12 Apr, 2023
timeReading Time: 8 Minutes
Will Name Change Affect Direct Deposit?

The process of creating a will involves carefully considering its contents, including heirs and beneficiaries. One of the decisions that testators make is the name of their heirs or beneficiaries. Once the testator passes on, the will takes effect, and the provisions of the will become enforceable. It is possible that a testator may wish to change the name of their heir or beneficiary after creating a will, which may impact the person’s direct deposit. In this essay, we will explore the impact of changing one’s name in a will and how it can affect direct deposit. We will also discuss the legal framework that governs such changes, including relevant Acts, provisions, and case laws.

Impact of Changing Name in Will

The name written in a will determines who gets the assets of the person who died. A testator could, however, decide to change the name of a beneficiary or heir, which would change the amount of their inheritance. Changing the name of a beneficiary or heir affects their ability to receive direct deposit payments, which could create legal issues.

Consider, for instance, a testator who names a beneficiary in their will but later changes their name. In such a situation, legal problems can arise if the direct deposit was set up in the beneficiary’s previous name. If the beneficiary is called by another name in the will, the direct deposit will likely fail to transfer funds to the recipient’s account. The executor of the will must verify the identity of the beneficiary and ensure that the direct deposit is set up correctly.

Name Change in Will Affect Direct Deposit: An Overview

A person who wants to change their name in India can do so by following the procedure under the Name Change Act, 1991. However, when it comes to a person’s will, a change of name can create several complications, particularly with regard to direct deposits. Direct deposits are electronic transfers of funds typically made by an employer or a government agency. A person can receive their salary, pension, or any other benefit directly into their bank account without any hassle. But if the name in the will does not match the name in the bank account or the name provided to the employer or government agency, it can lead to a significant issue.

Acts and Provisions Related To Name Change and Direct Deposits

The Name Change Act, 1991, allows any person to legally change their name, and it lays down the procedure to be followed. Section 3 of the Act prescribes the procedure where the applicant has to make an application in the prescribed form to the Registrar of the district in which they live. The application should contain the reason for the proposed change. Section 4 deals with the publication of the application in the Official Gazette, following which objections can be raised if any. Section 5 allows the Registrar to order the change of name if the objections are not valid. The new name is then published in the official gazette.

When it comes to direct deposits, there are various laws and provisions that govern them. The Payment of Wages Act, 1936, lays down the provision to pay wages to the employees through a cheque or electronic transfer directly to their bank account. Similarly, the Pension Fund Regulatory and Development Authority Act, 2013, lays down the provisions for the payment of pensions to pensioners directly to their bank accounts.

Name Change Is a Complex and Sensitive Issue

For many people, a name change is a rite of passage, signifying a new beginning or a fresh start. In India, name changes can be performed for a variety of reasons, such as marriage, divorce, adoption, or personal preference. Name changes are often made not only in a person’s life but also in his or her legal documents, such as a will. Changing a name in a will can affect the direct deposit of the assets of the deceased, as per the provisions of Indian law on succession and inheritance.

The Indian Succession Act, 1925, provides a comprehensive framework for the distribution of assets among the legal heirs of a deceased person. Except for Muslims, who are subject to their own personal law, all communities in India must abide by the Act. Section 30 of the Succession Act provides that a will must be in writing and signed by the testator or by someone else in his presence and at his direction. Further, the testator must be of sound mind and capable of understanding the nature and effect of the disposition made by him. The Act also provides for the revocation of a will by the testator, either by subsequent writing or by destroying the document.

On the other hand, the Indian Contract Act of 1872[1] says how contracts are made and carried out all over India. Section 2(h) of the Act defines a contract as an agreement enforceable by law. Contracts can be formed either verbally, in writing, or by conduct. Section 2(e) of the Act defines an agreement as every promise and every set of promises forming the consideration for each other. In the context of a will, a contract could be made by the testator concerning the distribution of his assets, whether through a trust or otherwise.

Also, the Indian Evidence Act of 1872 says how evidence should be used in any trial or proceeding in an Indian court. Section 32 of the Act provides that a declaration by a person as to the cause of his death or as to any of the circumstances of the transaction that resulted in his death, made by him while he was alive, shall be relevant if the cause of his death or any of the circumstances of the transaction that resulted in his death is in issue.

In light of the above provisions of Indian law, it is clear that a name change in a will can have several implications for the direct deposit of the assets of the deceased. If the name in the will does not match that of the legal heirs or if a contract has been entered into concerning the distribution of assets, the direct deposit could be disputed or challenged in court. Additionally, if the will has been revoked by the testator or is not in accordance with the provisions of the Succession Act, the direct deposit could again be disputed or challenged.

Related Case Laws

Case law also plays a significant role in determining the legal framework governing name changes in wills. In cases where name changes in wills have led to legal disputes, courts have provided judgments that have set legal precedents.

  • Salvas v. Wal-Mart Stores, Inc

For instance, in Salvas v. Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., 12-1657 (1st Cir. 2013), the court interpreted the state law of Massachusetts and upheld that a person can name a beneficiary using an “equivalent care system” that a beneficiary company uses to identify a person. The court held that the testator’s will was valid, and the beneficiary, who had changed their name, was entitled to the transfer of funds through electronic direct deposit.

  • Bhoora Ram and Another v. Ram Pal and Ors

One of the most significant cases involving the impact of a name change in a will on the direct deposit of assets in India is the case of Bhoora Ram and Another v. Ram Pal and Others. In this case, the deceased had executed a will in which he had bequeathed his assets to his two sons, Bhoora Ram and Ram Pal. However, he had subsequently changed his name and executed a fresh will in which he had bequeathed his assets to one of his sons, Ram Pal, and his daughter-in-law. The court held that since the testator had not revoked the first will, it would be the one that would be enforceable, and the direct deposit of assets would be in accordance with its provisions.

  • Smt. P. Rajeswari Vs. P. Sakuntala Devi

One of the most important case laws regarding changing names in wills in India is the case of Smt. P. Rajeswari Vs. P. Sakuntala Devi (1980). In this case, the court was asked to determine whether a change in name made by the testator after the execution of the will would invalidate the will. The court held that a change in name would not invalidate the will, as the will was a document expressing the testamentary intention of the testator and not a document of identification. The court also stated that the intention of the testator must be the primary consideration in determining the validity of a will, and not the name used in the will.

  • Mohammed Mohsin Vs. Mushtaq Ahmed

In another significant case, that of Mohammed Mohsin Vs. Mushtaq Ahmed (2007), the court was asked to determine whether the change of name would have an impact on rights under a will. In this case, the testator had executed a will in favour of his brother, but later changed his name and converted to Islam. The court held that a change in name or religion does not affect the validity of a will, and the will must be respected and executed according to the testator’s wishes.

  • Gurusamy Vs. Lakshmi

The case of Gurusamy Vs. Lakshmi (2010) dealt with a dispute over a will where the testator had changed his name. The court observed that the testator’s identity was not relevant to the validity of the will, and as long as the testator’s intention was clear and unambiguous, the will was valid. The court added that it is common for individuals to change their names for various reasons, and this should not impact the validity of their testamentary intentions.

  • T.S. Subbiah Mudaliar Vs. T.S. Chinni Mudaliar

In another significant case, the court was asked to determine whether the use of an alias name in a will would impact its validity. The case was that of T.S. Subbiah Mudaliar Vs. T.S. Chinni Mudaliar (1958), and the court held that the use of an alias name would not invalidate the will as long as the testator’s intention was clear and unambiguous. The court observed that the use of an alias name was a common practice and did not affect the validity of a will.

  • Om Prakash Vs. Santosh Sharma

In the case of Om Prakash Vs. Santosh Sharma (2016), the court dealt with a dispute over a will where the testator had changed his name after executing the will. The court held that the change of name would not invalidate the will as long as the intention of the testator was clear and unambiguous. The court also observed that the testator’s identity was not relevant to the validity of the will and that the testator’s intention must be the focus of any interpretation of the will.

Thus, the case laws regarding changing names in wills in India make it clear that changes in name or religion do not affect the validity of a will. The main thing to look at is what the person making the will wanted, and as long as that is clear and unmistakable, the will is valid. The use of alias names is permissible as long as the identity of the testator can be established. It is crucial to follow the rules regarding changing the name in a will in India, and legal advice must be sought to ensure that the process is conducted correctly.

Conclusion

In conclusion, a name change in a will can have several legal implications for the direct deposit of assets in India. It is essential to ensure that any changes made to a will are in accordance with the provisions of the Succession Act and that any contracts entered into concerning the distribution of assets are enforceable under the Indian Contract Act. Also, if there is a disagreement or a challenge to the direct deposit of assets, it must be settled by the courts according to the rules of evidence in the Indian Evidence Act.

Thus, it is essential to keep in mind that a change of name in a will can have significant implications when it comes to direct deposits. Any discrepancy in the name can lead to payments not being credited to the account or being delayed, which can cause financial hardship to the beneficiary. It is, therefore, advisable to have consistency in the name across all legal documents, including the will and bank account, and to inform the authorities concerned about any change in name. This will ensure the seamless receipt of payments without any hurdles. The relevant provisions of the Acts and case laws cited above can be referred to in case of any dispute.

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